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MAPs

Wednesday 17 September 2003

The assembly of microtubules is an essential step in neurogenesis. It is modulated by a family of molecules called microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs).

MAPs have been divided into 2 main groups by molecular mass, high molecular weight MAPs, which include MAP1A, MAP1B (157129), and MAP2 (157130), and another group of intermediate-sized proteins, which include the abundant tau MAPs.

MAP1B, also named MAP5, is a component of long cross-bridges between microtubules and is a filamentous molecule with a small spherical segment at one end.

Members

MAP1A MAP1B MAP2 MAP3 MAP4 MAP5 MAP6 MAP7
MAPT (tau)

Pathology

- tau protein (TAU) associated diseases (taupathies)

See also

- microtubules

References

- Baas PW, Qiang L. Neuronal microtubules: when the MAP is the roadblock. Trends Cell Biol. 2005 Apr;15(4):183-7. PMID: 15817373

- Maiato H, Sampaio P, Sunkel CE. Microtubule-associated proteins and their essential roles during mitosis. Int Rev Cytol. 2004;241:53-153. PMID: 15548419

- Popov AV, Karsenti E. Stu2p and XMAP215: turncoat microtubule-associated proteins? Trends Cell Biol. 2003 Nov;13(11):547-50. PMID: 14573345

- Kinoshita K, Habermann B, Hyman AA. XMAP215 : a key component of the dynamic microtubule cytoskeleton. Trends Cell Biol. 2002 Jun ;12(6):267-73. PMID : 12074886