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lymph node

Friday 10 June 2005

Components

- nodal cortex

- nodal paracortical compartment ( nodal paracortex )
- nodal sinusoidal compartment

Movement of the immune cell through the lymph node

Naive T cells enter the lymph node through high endothelial venules, which express the chemokine CCL21 (secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine, or SLC).

Antigen-presenting cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages enter the lymph node through afferent lymphatics. Mature dendritic cells express CCR7, and macrophages express CCR2.

T cells and dendritic cells together localize in the T-cell zone in a CCR7-dependent manner. Antigen presentation results in the activation of T cells, and effector T cells exit the lymph node through the efferent lymphatics.

B cells are recruited to the follicles, where CXCL13 (B-cell chemoattractant 1 [BCA-1]) is present.

Pathology : nodal pathology / nodal histopathology

- nodal anomalies
- nodal lesional syndromes
- nodal diseases
- nodal tumors

Videos

- Histology of the lymph node (by Washington Deceit)

- Reticulin fibers in the lymph node (by Washington Deceit)

See also

- nodal follicular compartment
- nodal paracortical compartment ( nodal paracortex )
- nodal sinusoidal compartment
- germinal centers
- D2-40+ CD31+ perifollicular sinus around most of the follicular compartment
- bcl-6-negative monocytoid B-cells
- Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)
- histiocyte-rich B-cell proliferations
- prominence of the perifollicular sinus
- reactive lymphadenitis
- lymphatic
- cytokines
- lymph fluid
- normal and altered germinal center reactions
- sinus drainage
- nodal T-cell lymphomas

Open references

- Histopathology of the Lymph Nodes. Susan A. Elmore. 2007. doi : 10.1080/01926230600964722